Melrose weighs options after ‘low-ball’ bids for GKN Powder Metallurgy unit (US)

The industrialists who bought GKN, the British engineering group, in a controversial £8bn deal this year are weighing options for one of its key divisions after receiving a string of “low-ball” takeover offers.  Sky News has learnt that executives at Melrose are deciding whether to press on with an immediate auction of GKN Powder Metallurgy following initial bids last week valuing the business at about £1.6bn. That figure was well belowContinue reading

A rare metal called neodymium (US)

You may not have heard of neodymium, but you’re probably carrying some of it around with you right now. It’s in your cellphone, your headphones and you might be driving several pounds of it around in your car. Neodymium — pronounced “nee-oh-DIM-ee-um” — is one of 17 chemically similar elements called rare earth elements, and demand for this metal is on the rise. “Neodymium is responsible for most, if not all, of the growth in rare earth demand at the moment,” said Roderick Eggert, deputy director of the Critical Materials Institute at Colorado School of Mines. For an iPhone to vibrate, for AirPods to play music, for wind turbines to generate power and for a Toyota Prius Continue reading

Australian’s Comsteel Celebrates 100 years of steelmaking (US)

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Decoupling stress and corrosion to predict metal failure (US)

An Arizona State University research team has released new insights about intergranular stress-corrosion cracking (SCC), an environmental cause of premature failure in engineered structures, including bridges, aircraft and nuclear power generating plants. The research, Decoupling the role of stress and corrosion in the intergranular cracking of noble alloys, released today in Nature Materials, addresses the assumption that intergranular SCC is the result of the simultaneous presence of a tensile stress and corrosion, and demonstrates that the roles of stress and corrosion can be decoupled, or can act independently. “The finding is the culmination of about 30 years’ work on this kind of stress corrosion problem,” said lead researcher Karl Sieradzki, a professor of materials science andContinue reading

Constellium CEO Says Company Still Open to ‘Serious’ Suitors (US)

  • ‘We’re for sale every day as a listed company,’ Germain says
  •  Constellium was seen weighing options for takeover last year

Constellium NV, which was said to have drawn takeover interest last year, hasn’t closed the door to prospective suitors, Chief Executive Officer Jean-Marc Germain said. “We’re for sale every day as a listed company, so we’ll study any offer that is serious,” Germain said in a telephone interview Monday. “If somebody comes in, it’s got to be something that makes a real difference for our shareholders vis-a-vis executing our plan.” Last year, the Dutch maker of aluminum products used in automobiles, aerospace and packaging which runs plants in the U.S. was said to be weighing options after drawing takeover interest. At the time, Credit Suisse Group AG analysts said the company could be worth as much as $18 a share in a takeover. Shares climbed 3.3 percent to $11.875 at 1:32 p.m. in New York. Rising demand forContinue reading

Keep cool: Researchers develop magnetic cooling cycle (US)

A novel technology could provide a solution for cooling processes: refrigeration using magnetic materials in magnetic fields. Researchers have developed the idea of a cooling cycle based on the ‘magnetic memory’ of special alloys.- On photo, The Dresden High Magnetic Field Laboratory of te HZDR, where the new magnetic cooling system was developed

Besides superfluous features like touchscreens and internal cameras, basic refrigerator technology hasn’t changed much in decades. They still chill your milk by way of chemical refrigerants and compressors, and are notorious drains on your electricity bill. Now researchers in Europe have shown promising early results with an experimental cooling system that uses magnetic fields and shape-shifting memory alloys. Magnetic cooling systems work by exploiting the magnetocaloric effect – which basically means that certain materials will change temperature whenContinue reading

How one engineer is “fighting a good fight” against metal corrosion (US)

Nick Birbilis finds the deterioration mechanism of a metal fascinating. His pioneering work in preserving metallic elements has won him the prestigious Batterham Medal.

Professor Nick Birbilis spends his working days in constant battle with nature. As the Woodside Innovation Chair and Head of Materials Science and Engineering at Monash University, his career is devoted to controlling the corrosive qualities of metals. “I feel like I’m fighting a good fight,” he said. “To some extent, all engineers are trying to go one better than nature.” An expert in corrosion, durability management and the behaviour of metallic elements, Birbilis was awarded the 2017 Batterham Medal in recognition of his contribution to Continue reading

SpaceX to use superalloys in Mars rocket Raptor engines, says Elon Musk (US)

SpaceX’s current Texas facilities feature a test stand for Raptor, the engine intended to power BFR and BFS to Mars. (SpaceX)

A few days after he touched upon methods of creating BFR propellant on Mars, SpaceX CEO Elon Musk mentioned in a tweet that the launch company was using cutting-edge combinations of metals (known as superalloys) to ensure the efficiency and reliability of its Raptor rocket engine, a critical requirement for BFR to enable sustainable colonization of Mars. In response to a tweeted question about types of metal alloys currently in use at SpaceX, Musk briefly delved into the complexities of building BFR’s propulsion system, particularly with respect to alloys capable of surviving the intense conditions inside a rocket engine:

“[SpaceX is using] SX 300 & soon SX 500. Kind of a modern version of Inconel superalloys. High strength at temperature, extreme oxidation resistance. Needed for ~800 atmosphere, hot, oxygen-rich turbopump on Raptor rocket engine.” – Elon Musk

There’s a lot to break down for the layperson in Musk’s tweet. First and foremost, commenters (your author included) immediately jumped to the conclusion that “SX 300/500” referred to some sort custom SpaceX material, given that SX is a frequent shorthand for Continue reading

AddUp acquires DED steel 3D printing firm BeAM (US)

AddUp, the French leader in the design, production and marketing of metal 3D printing machines and production lines, based in Clermont-Ferrand, a joint-venture between Fives and Michelin, today announced the acquisition of BeAM, based in Strasbourg, a leader in the Directed Energy eposition (DED) technology, an additive manufacturing process dedicated to the production of large parts and the repair market. Created in 2012 in Strasbourg with subsidiaries in Cincinnati and Singapore, BeAM is a French manufacturer of industrial metal additive manufacturing machines which use the DED technology and has a broad range of customers both in France and abroad, in particular, in the aeronautics, defense and energy sectors. The 100% acquisition of BeAM will enable AddUp to expand its portfolio of Continue reading

CTC to develop additive technologies for the Defense Industry (US)

JOHNSTOWN, Pa. Concurrent Technologies Corporation (CTC) has won two subaward contracts — worth a total of $1 million — from Northeastern University, supporting the Army Research Laboratory, in the area of shelters and military structures.

The first subaward, which will run over a 12-month period of performance, calls for research and development of innovations in energy efficiency, ballistic engineering, and advanced decontaminable and low-observable coatings. Under the terms of the subaward, CTC, Northeastern University, and several other universities will focused on engineered materials, materials by design, modeling of additive

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