World’s Largest 1.8 M Titanium 3D Print Drone for Defense Industry (US)


Australian advanced manufacturing company Titomic has delivered the largest titanium 3D printed drone or unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) ever made, measuring more than 1.8 metres in diameter.

The UAV was manufactured at Titomic’s R&D Bureau in Melbourne, home of the world’s largest and fastest metal 3D printer. Reports from Defence Connect amongst others said that the quadcopter UAV was delivered to an unnamed client, and was printed on Titomic’s TKF9000 machine, which has a print bed of 9 x 3 x 1.5 metres. According to Titomic, the titanium structure offers a rugged and lightweight design, and the craft is “well-suited for deployment in live combat situations.” The system incorporates Titomic’s patented additive manufacturingContinue reading

Chinese physicist says revolutionary technique means alloys can be developed in hours instead of years (US)

  • Inspired by early colour television, method can create thousands of alloys quickly
  • Leader of Beijing team says a ‘revolution in material science’ is close to hand

Chinese physicists say they have developed a method that can cut the time involved in the discovery of alloys from years to hours. The technique has led to the creation of high performance alloys, including the world’s toughest amorphous metal, or metallic glass, for use in extremely hot environments. The search for an alloy typically takes years, but now it can be done in less

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Russian scientists create new aluminum alloy with flexibility, strength, lightness (US)

Lighter and faster aircraft and vehicles require lighter materials. One of the most promising materials is aluminum, or rather, aluminum-based composites.

Scientists from NUST MISIS scientific school “Phase Transitions and Development of Non-Ferrous Alloys” created a new strong Al-Ni-La composite for aircraft and automobile industry. Doping elements were added to aluminum melt, forming special chemical compounds that further formedContinue reading

Chinese company produces large seamless circular forging for nuclear reactor (US)

China’s Taiyuan Iron & Steel Group (TISCO) announced Tuesday that it has produced a huge seamless circular forging with high-purity stainless steel, which will be used in a 4th-generation nuclear power unit. According to the company, the piece, 15.6 meters in diameter and 150 tonnes in weight, is the world’s largest in terms of size and weight. It will be used as the support ring for the core component of the pilot reactor for a 60 million kilowatts fast neutron reactor in Xiapu, Fujian Province. The forging is required to be able to bear a weight of 7,000 tonnes and a temperature of 650 degrees Celsius, and operate for four decades continuously. TISCO, located in Taiyuan of Shanxi Province, has supplied more than 50,000 tonnes of steel for nuclear power projects, including 45,000 tonnes of stainless stee

JINAN — A Chinese steel mill rolled off the world’s largest seamless ring forging piece, which was developed especially as the key part of a nuclear power unit. The loop-shape stainless steel piece, produced by the ShandongContinue reading

U.S. Department of Defense develops advanced alloys for the next generation of infrared imaging technology (US)

As part of a U.S. Department of Defense Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative effort, Arizona State University Professor Yong-Hang Zhang will study the quality and stability of silicon-germanium-tin alloys and develop innovative device architectures for infrared applications. 

Brass, bronze and steel are metal alloys in which the combination of chemical elements — copper and zinc, copper and tin, iron and carbon, respectively — create unique properties, such as high strength and corrosion resistance, that can be used for particular purposes.  Arizona State University Professor Yong-Hang Zhang and Associate Professor Andrew Chizmeshyaare exploring these purposes as part of a U.S. Department of Defense Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative effort. They will study the fundamental material properties Continue reading

Scientists apply AI to predict material properties (US)

Researchers from Singapore, the U.S. and Russia have developed artificial intelligence that can be applied to materials science, in order to predict and engineer material properties. This could lead to creating new materials with special properties

Technologists at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore have teamed up with scientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology to build a machine learning system that is capable of predicting changes to the properties of materials from straining the material. It is hoped that the new approach will lead to the engineering of new materials with tailored properties. Potential applications include Continue reading

US Navy invents zinc-free anode enhanced by ‘very small addition of tin (US)

A U.S. Navy research team has discovered an alloy for making better, cheaper underwater anodes with the potential for shifting the global business of maintaining ships and piers. A patent application was published by the federal government on Thursday for the new aluminum anode alloy containing a “very small addition of tin.” It was invented by Craig Matzdorf and Alan Grieve of the Naval Air Warfare Center’s Aircraft Division in Maryland. Sacrificial anodes are attached to marine vessels and structures to protect them from corrosion caused by the flow of electrons between metal surfaces like iron, steel, and aluminum. When submerged in seawater, these metals form a battery. Many anodes are made of alloys consisting mostly of zinc, a metal that can easily absorb the electrons Continue reading

US Army Air Force Engineers Focus on Metals Research (US)

Engineers at the Air Force Research Laboratory are exploring new metals and metal processing techniques for use in future aerospace applications. (Credit Photo @Air Force Research Laboratory)

Carbon-fiber composite materials have been the darling of the aerospace industry in recent years. But, metal still plays a critical role in commercial and military aircraft, especially for applications that involve high temperatures or high stresses, such as engines and landing gear. Engineers at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) are exploring new metals and new metal processing techniques for use in hotter, faster and more efficient aircraft and spacecraft being developed for future combat missions. “Until you can make a jet engine out of anything else, metals Continue reading

US Department of Defense, grants research for detecting structural damage in high-strength ship-building materials (US)

Haiying Huang, a professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at The University of Texas at Arlington, has earned a pair of grants worth nearly $900,000 to monitor structural health and detect when and where damage happens. Using a $599,928 grant from the Department of Defense, Huang will attempt to design ultrasound transducers, devices that convert mechanical vibrations to electrical signals or vice versa, that can be glued to ships’ hulls to detect and monitor material degradation that causes corrosions on high-strength ship-building materials. These material degradations are microscale in size and usually cover the entire surface of the hull. If they are not treated, they can cause the alloys to break down and impact the ship’s seaworthiness. Huang’s research will focus on degradations that are early in their development, when they are so small that they are undetectable by Continue reading

3-D printed tool cuts through titanium, wins innovation prize (US)

Jimmy Toton inspects a 3D printed steel milling cutter. (Credit Photo@RMIT University)

Ph.D. candidate Jimmy Toton from RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia, has won the 2019 Young Defence Innovator Award and $15,000 prize at the Avalon International Airshow for the research, which was conducted with Defence Materials Technology Centre (DMTC) and industry partner Sutton Tools. Because the metals used in Defence and aerospace are so strong, making high quality tools to cut them is a major, and expensive, challenge. This collaborative project conducted at RMIT’s Advanced Manufacturing Precinct is the first convincing demonstration of 3-D printed steel tools that can cut titanium alloys as well as, or in some cases better than, conventional steel tools. “Now that we’ve shown what’s possible, the full potential of 3-D printing can start being applied to this Continue reading