Pratt and Whitney Sells Israeli Carmel Forge Facility (US)

Bet Shemesh Engines signed an agreement to buy Pratt and Whitney-owned jet parts manufacturer Carmel Forge for $ 58.5 million.  Carmel Forge will continue to supply parts to Pratt & Whitney under a 10-year, $360 million agreement.

Israeli engine part manufacturer Bet Shemesh Motors has signed an agreement to acquire Israeli Carmel Forge from American aerospace manufacturer Pratt & Whitney Company Inc., the former announced in a Tel Aviv Stock Exchange filing Sunday. According to the terms of the transaction, Carmel Forge will sign a framework agreement for the supply of parts to the Pratt & Whitney Group over a period of ten years for an estimated total of $362 Continue reading

Newest Lithium Mine Officially Opens In Australia (US)

The lithium train shows no sign of slowing in WA as the state’s newest mine officially opens, with plans already in motion to expand the Pilbara operation. The first shipment from Pilbara Minerals’ Pilgangoora lithium-tantalum project left the mine on October 2 but was officially opened by WA Mines and Petroleum Minister Bill Johnston on Friday. 

Located 120 kilometres south of Port Hedland, the mine will produce 330,000 tonnes of lithium a year and about 300,000 pounds of tantalum. The Pilgangoora project’s workforce peaked at more than 800 during construction, but now there are about 200 operational staff on-site and in Perth.The opening comes just more than four years to theContinue reading

New High Entropy Alloy to Replace Platanium Alloys in Catalysts (US)

The industry has been traditionally deploying platinum alloys as catalysts for oxygen reduction, which is for example essential in fuel cells or metal-air batteries. Expensive and rare, that metal imposes strict restrictions on manufacture. Researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) and Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung have discovered an alloy made up of five elements that is noble metal-free and as active as platinum. They published their paper in the journal Advanced Energy Materials on October 21, 2018.  On photo Tobias Löffler, Alan Savan, Alfred Ludwig and Wolfgang Schuhmann (from the left) in the laboratory.

New neighbours form active centres

The catalytic properties of non-noble elements and their alloys are usually rather poor. To the researchers’ surprise, one alloy made up of five almost equally balanced components offer much better properties. This is because of theContinue reading

Thyssenkrupp’s new Moroccan location ready for take-off (US)

Morocco’s aerospace industry is booming. With an annual growth rate of over 15%, it is a significant driving force behind the nation’s economy. This encouraging development is also fuelling demand for local material suppliers and service providers.

“This is a trend we identified early on, and we will be commissioning our highly modern materials processing and logistics centre in Casablanca before the end of the year, so that we can supply our local customers with the required materials and services,” explained Patrick Marous, CEO thyssenkrupp Aerospace. Eric Cornilleau, managingContinue reading

Uddeholms Opens Its New 3D Printing Metal Powder Facility (Swedish)

Under fredagen invigde Uddeholm sin senaste produktionsanläggning. En helt ny produkt ska tillverkas: ett pulver – som ska föra Uddeholm in i framtiden. Uddeholmsbolaget ska med skrot som råvara tillverka pulver till 3D-skrivare. Det är en produkt som ska föra det gamla anrika bolaget in i framtiden. Pulvret har en kornstorlek på 20-50 mikrometer (miljondels meter) och säljs för 1 000 kronor kilot. – Personligen tycker jag det här är den viktigaste Continue reading

A rare metal called neodymium (US)

You may not have heard of neodymium, but you’re probably carrying some of it around with you right now. It’s in your cellphone, your headphones and you might be driving several pounds of it around in your car. Neodymium — pronounced “nee-oh-DIM-ee-um” — is one of 17 chemically similar elements called rare earth elements, and demand for this metal is on the rise. “Neodymium is responsible for most, if not all, of the growth in rare earth demand at the moment,” said Roderick Eggert, deputy director of the Critical Materials Institute at Colorado School of Mines. For an iPhone to vibrate, for AirPods to play music, for wind turbines to generate power and for a Toyota Prius Continue reading

Chinese vessel collects cobalt samples in the Pacific (US)

Mawei Shipbuilding is constructing a vessel designed by Nautilus Mining and equipped with diggers to trawl the sea (Credit Photo@ Reuters)

A Chinese deep-sea exploration vessel has returned to port in Guangdong after collecting samples of so-called cobalt-bearing crusts during a 138-day survey in the west Pacific, China’s official Xinhua news agency reported on Sunday. Cobalt is used in batteries for electric vehicles, an important industry for China, the world’s largest auto market. Chinese companies are some of the biggest investors in cobalt mining projects in the Democratic Republic of Congo, the world’s biggest producer. The Ocean No. 6 vessel, designed in China, conducted a survey of cobalt-bearing crusts, found on the surface of underwater mountains, in more than 30 areas, Xinhua cited YangContinue reading

Major €80 million investment project at thyssenkrupp Steel nearing completion (US)

New ladle furnace at Duisburg steel mill: 80 million investment in quality and technology.

  • Strategic investment for the production of high-quality steel grades with optimised degrees of purity
  • Signal for the future of the Duisburg location
  • Total investment in the high double-digit million range

After a scheduled construction period of a year, the moment has arrived: Smelting is successfully underway at the new thyssenkrupp Steel ladle furnace in Duisburg. A key milestone has thus been reached in this strategically important investment in the steelworks sector. The new double ladle furnace has a capacity of 265 tonnes per smelting process. It is used to produce highest quality, high-alloy steel grades with optimised degrees of purity. “The new ladle furnace will help us to permanently enhance our competitive position,” emhasises Dr. Arnd Köfler, Executive Board member for Production at thyssenkrupp Steel Europe. “With the new plant, we are filling a gap in Continue reading

China Is Beating the US in Rare-Earths Metals for the Defense Industry (US)

Each stealthy F-35 strike fighter requires 920 pounds of rare-earth material, according to DOD. Each Arleigh Burke DDG-51 destroyer requires 5,200 pounds. An SSN-774 Virginia-class submarine needs 9,200 pounds.

How to view China’s recent threat to limit domestic production of rare earths, those 16 elements that make our cellphones and smart bombs work? It’s the latest move in a game that began before the United States realized it was even playing, that has grown more complex than U.S. leaders realize, and that is nearing a very unfortunate ending. The game began in earnest in 1980, when the United States made two moves that gave its opponent an advantage it has never relinquished. One was industrial: Molycorp, then the country’s largest rare earth mining and processing company, began transferring its processing technology to China (as detailed by Boston University professor JulieContinue reading

Rust Costs the Pentagon $21 Billion Per Year (US)

On Sept 201è, the first Soviet nuclear submarine, November-class K-3 “Leninsky Komsomol”, begins her journey to be restored and turned into a museum ship.

The Defense Department isn’t doing a good job determining how much to spend to prevent damage from nature’s basic chemical reactions.

Rust costs the Pentagon more money annually than many of its most expensive weapons systems—up to $21 billion per year, according to a Defense Department-commissioned audit released in March. The report indicates the corrosion of metals that make up modern weapons systems like fighter jets, ships, ballistic missiles and nuclear weapons can sometimes approach one-third of the total operations and maintenance costs of those systems. TheContinue reading